Tag «Author: Giffin»

Single Sundays: Love the One You’re With by Emily Giffin

Synopsis for Love the One You’re With (from Goodreads):
The New York Times bestselling author of Something Borrowed, Something Blue, and Baby Proof delivers another captivating novel about women and the choices that define them. This is the story for anyone who has ever wondered: How can I truly love the one I’m with when I can’t forget the one who got away?

Ellen and Andy’s first year of marriage doesn’t just seem perfect, it is perfect. There is no question how deep their devotion is, and how naturally they bring out the best in each other. But one fateful afternoon, Ellen runs into Leo for the first time in eight years. Leo, the one who brought out the worst in her. Leo, the one who left her heartbroken with no explanation. Leo, the one she could never quite forget. When his reappearance ignites long-dormant emotions, Ellen begins to question whether the life she’s living is the one she’s meant to live.

Love the One You’re With is a powerful story about one woman at the crossroads of true love and real life.

Review:

Again, this is another one of those books that I read much to early in life–though in all honesty I think I wouldn’t enjoy it later in life either.

I don’t enjoy stories featuring love triangles and by far the worst type of love triangle is one featuring an affair. While cheating is the main premise of Something Borrowed I had a better grasp of why it was occurring more than why it was here. It doesn’t mean I condone it in anyway, but the story was written in such a way that you sided with Rachel when all was said in done.

But here, I really couldn’t care less what happened and that was because the characters were dull. I didn’t really like anyone and I just never connected with them.

This was the fourth Emily Giffin book I read–and the last. While I can appreciate her taking realistic issues as the main focus of her books, I just wish she would follow-through with realistic plotlines or plotlines with characters that have some depth to them. I’m tired of reading Chick Lit books with selfish heroines who don’t think clearly in anything that they do. Where have all the strong heroines gone and how do we get them back?

Conclusion:

Another miss from Giffin I think. It just fell flat in everything it tried to do. Pass!

Rating: 2.5/5

Shorthand Stats:
Genre: Chick Lit, Women’s Fiction, Romance, Drama, Contemporary
Recommended for: 30+ women
Heat Rating: cool
Similar Reads: Something Borrowed by Emily Griffin (Darcy and Rachel Series #1); Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella

Single Sundays: Baby Proof by Emily Giffin

Synopsis for Baby Proof (from Goodreads):
From the author of the smash hits Something Borrowed and Something Blue comes a novel that explores the question: is there ever a deal-breaker when it comes to true love?
First comes love. Then comes marriage. Then comes . . . a baby carriage? Isn’t that what all women want?
Not so for Claudia Parr. And just as she gives up on finding a man who feels the same way, she meets warm, wonderful Ben. Things seem too good to be true when they fall in love and agree to buck tradition with a satisfying, child-free marriage. Then the unexpected occurs: one of them has a change of heart. One of them wants children after all.
This is the witty, heartfelt story about what happens to the perfect couple when they suddenly want different things. It’s about feeling that your life is set and then realizing that nothing is as you thought it was–and that there is no possible compromise. It’s about deciding what is most important in life, and taking chances to get it. But most of all, it’s about the things we will do–and won’t do–for love.

Review:

After enjoying Something Borrowed and Something Blue by Emily Giffin, I decided to give her other novels a shot. Surprisingly my small town library seem to have most of her books so I decided to grab this one next (I actually thought it might be connected to the “Something” series but it isn’t).

I think this is another case where I was much too young to be reading this type of novel. I am not a married woman who is debating about having children so I really didn’t relate to the characters. It was kind-of above me so I feel indifferent about the novel and what happens within it.

I found this book to be slightly more realistic in the sense that this problem (whether or not to have children in your marriage) is one that many couples go through. Is the path that Claudia goes through realistic–yes but in a very exaggerated way that I think will turn off a lot of readers. As you read it, you will probably think of 20 other solutions to the problems Claudia faces that she blatantly ignores and that will probably frustrate you.

I really don’t remember much else from this book because it was a little dull when all is said and done.

Conclusion:

I think my rating is pretty generous because I don’t remember much else from the book. I think most readers will get frustrated with the journey that unfolds but if you enjoyed Love the One You’re With more than Something Borrowed, you might like this novel.

Rating: 3/5

Shorthand Stats:
Genre: Chick Lit, Women’s Fiction, Romance, Drama, Contemporary
Recommended for: 30+ women
Heat Rating: cool
Similar Reads: Something Borrowed by Emily Giffin (Darcy & Rachel Series #1)

Movie Mondays: Something Borrowed

Movie Mondays: On Mondays, I will review a book series or novel that has been made into a movie. I will then answer the question that everyone asks: which is better, the movie or the book? Here is this week’s offering:

Book: Something Borrowed by Emily Giffin | Movie: Something Borrowed (2011)

Which did I read/see first? the BOOK

Book Cover | Movie Poster

The Book:

Series: Darcy and Rachel
Genre: Contemporary, Romance

Thoughts:

My full review of the series can be found here but overall, I did enjoy this book. Giffin does a great job of creating likeable characters despite the circumstances. I hate reading about stories where one person is cheating on the other. It’s just slimy to me and I have a hard time getting past it.

Like I said in my previous review, it’s easy to hate Darcy and I really like Dex and Rachel together. I liked watching them fall in love. But the book wouldn’t have as much drama and meaning if there wasn’t an affair so from a critic’s perspective I can understand why Giffin choose this method.

Conclusion:

I was definitely too young when I read this book (like I was just starting high school) and I think if I read it when I was closer to my 30s I might have enjoyed it a bit more. Still, if you are like me and don’t like stories about cheating or chick lit, avoid this book!

Rating: 3.5/5
Series Review: Full series review here!

Similar Reads: Queen of Babble by Meg Cabot (Queen of Babble #1)
It’s not a book but the movie Bride Wars (2009) with Anne Hathaway and Kate Hudson reminded me a lot of the relationship between Rachel and Darcy.

The Movie:

I was interested to see how this movie was going to be made more than anything. I find society doesn’t take well to cheating as a whole (though the irony is society still buys magazines plastered with allegations of adultery and the like) so this movie probably wouldn’t appeal to a lot of people. The box office reflects this (which I find interesting because the book was a bestseller for quite some time when it came out) but I have to say I did enjoy this movie very much.

I believe the main reason I love this movie is because of John Krasinski as Ethan. I honestly don’t remember Ethan’s character at ALL in Something Borrowed. Truth be told when I read the synopsis for Something Blue it never even occurred to me that Ethan was a character in Something Borrowed! But he really made this movie for me and I hope for everyone’s sake that the Something Blue movie actually happens because I would love to see more of Ethan. (Just an FYI, the movie was optioned and it sounds like the cast was given contracts for two movies but no word on production or release dates have been given so the odds are pretty low 🙁 )He was funny, blunt and charming and when I think back on the movie, I always think about his scenes.

That isn’t to say the rest of the cast isn’t great. Ginnifer Goodwin (although at the time she was typecasted for these romantic movie leads) has become one of my favourite actresses and I think she did a good job as Rachel. Colin Egglesfield as Dex wasn’t what I pictured exactly when I was reading the book but I think he did a good job. What I liked about his character in the movie was the fact that they try to emphasis more why Dex struggles with his choice between the girls: I found in the book it wasn’t really touched upon all that much. And Kate Hudson as Darcy was great–I absolutely despised her character like I did in the books so WIN.

As far as book to movie adaptions they have done a lot of creative modifications. Marcus wasn’t what I remember reading and I think they took some creative licence to make the movie more of a comedy when the book is definitely far from a comedy. It’s been so long since I read the book that I can’t remember every major plot point but I do know that a lot of the scenes in the movie were changed from the book. It captures the main message of the book overall so as far as adaptations go, it works.

So, which is better: the book or the movie?

In this case, the winner is the MOVIE. While I did enjoy the book, I enjoyed the movie a lot more because of the humour.

Do you agree? Leave a comment below!

Synopsis for Something Borrowed (from Goodreads): Something Borrowed tells the story of Rachel, a young attorney living and working in Manhattan. Rachel has always been the consummate good girl—until her thirtieth birthday, when her best friend, Darcy, throws her a party. That night, after too many drinks, Rachel ends up in bed with Darcy’s fiancé. Although she wakes up determined to put the one-night fling behind her, Rachel is horrified to discover that she has genuine feelings for the one guy she should run from. As the September wedding date nears, Rachel knows she has to make a choice. In doing so, she discovers that the lines between right and wrong can be blurry, endings aren’t always neat, and sometimes you have to risk all to win true happiness. Something Borrowed is a phenomenal debut novel that will have you laughing, crying, and calling your best friend.

Trailer:

Series Review: Darcy and Rachel by Emily Giffin

Series: Darcy & Rachel
Author: Emily Giffin
# of Books: 2 (Something Borrowed, Something Blue)

There is a prequel novella called The Diary of Darcy J. Rhone

Complete?: Yes
Genre: Contemporary, Romance, Drama, Chick Lit
Heat Rating: really warm
Movie Review: Catch my thoughts on the movie here!

Thoughts:

When this book came out, it was everywhere and I my eye was always drawn to the simple cover until one day I actually picked it up. I read this book long before my dislike of love triangles existed (ie, before I read Twilight) but even looking back at it, Something Borrowed never bothered me for one simple reason: it’s not really a love triangle. Also, Darcy is super easy to hate.

I don’t condone cheating on your partner–I personally think it is one of the worst things you could ever do–but when I was reading it, I really sided with Rachel. As I said it wasn’t hard. Darcy is the definition of someone who irritates me in real life: she’s vein, shallow and just doesn’t treat Rachel all that nicely. Add to it the fact that Darcy and Dex just didn’t seem to click the way Rachel and Dex do–which is why I say it isn’t really a love triangle because I think it is obvious to everyone who is really in love with who.

That isn’t to say Rachel is the greatest character ever. She doesn’t stick up for herself and never admits her true feelings. The fact of the matter is this whole book could have been avoided by just admitting what she felt for Dex years ago or telling her best friend.

Also, I feel like it is important to bring up Dex here and his role in it all. It isn’t fair to blame just the girls for what happens. It takes two to tango and he knew exactly what he was doing in all of this. In reading other reviews, readers harp on the girls for being annoying and weak but I feel like it is only fair to say that Dex isn’t the best object of affection that a book has seen. He actually reminds me of a male hybrid of Darcy and Rachel in the sense that he is a touch selfish but never really says his true feelings.

But I digress…

What I did like about this book is that there are a few good lines and I liked Rachel’s character development. She really grows as a person and I always like seeing that in a book.

Something Blue was a book I wasn’t looking forward to for obvious (once you read Something Borrowed or at least this book’s synopsis) reasons. I also didn’t remember Ethan that much so I wasn’t all that excited to read more about him. But I think in the end, I actually liked this book a lot more than Something Borrowed. I think watching the two characters develop into better people was great and it’s set in London 😛 But in all seriousness, I think it’s a great redemption novel for all involved.

Conclusion:

If you don’t like love triangles, cheating partners or selfish heroines, avoid these two books! Definitely Chick Lit but not at its finest. I also recommend this for an older crowd. I was just starting high school when I read these so I had a hard time relating to both of these characters. I’m not sure my perspective would change now that I am ~10 years older, but it is something to consider.

Rating: 4/5

Similar Reads: Queen of Babble by Meg Cabot (Queen of Babble #1)
It’s not a book but the movie Bride Wars (2009) with Anne Hathaway and Kate Hudson reminded me a lot of the relationship between Rachel and Darcy.

Synopsis for Something Borrowed (from Goodreads):
Something Borrowed tells the story of Rachel, a young attorney living and working in Manhattan. Rachel has always been the consummate good girl—until her thirtieth birthday, when her best friend, Darcy, throws her a party. That night, after too many drinks, Rachel ends up in bed with Darcy’s fiancé. Although she wakes up determined to put the one-night fling behind her, Rachel is horrified to discover that she has genuine feelings for the one guy she should run from. As the September wedding date nears, Rachel knows she has to make a choice. In doing so, she discovers that the lines between right and wrong can be blurry, endings aren’t always neat, and sometimes you have to risk all to win true happiness. Something Borrowed is a phenomenal debut novel that will have you laughing, crying, and calling your best friend.