Tag «boring»

Series Review: The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater

Series Review: Is this series worth your time? Does it get better as the novels progress? Or does it get worse? Find out below:

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Synopsis for The Raven Boys (from Goodreads):

“There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

breakdown

Series: The Raven Boys

There is a companion series in the works.

Author: Maggie Stiefvater
# of Books: 4 (The Raven Boys; The Dream Thieves; Blue Lily, Lily Blue; The Raven King)
Book Order: Chronological
Complete?: Yes
Genre: Young Adult, Supernatural, Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance
Heat Rating: cold
Point of View: Third Person, Multiple
Publication Dates: September 2012 – April 2016
Source & Format: Public Library–Hardcover & eBook

thoughts

Disclaimer: I stopped reading Dream Thieves (Book 2) at 32%. Find out why below…

Why I Picked it Up / My Expectations:

Ok, I couldn’t escape this series if I tried. It’s consistently raved about in the blogosphere and I just had to add it to my 5 Year 5 Book Challenge even though I didn’t love Stiefvater’s Wolves of Mercy Falls Series. But the concept was intriguing (perhaps a replacement for the void the Beautiful Creatures Series has left all these years) and all the talk had me eager to see what the hype was for.

What I Liked:

–The Mystery of the World–

The mystery of the world had me intrigued from the start of The Raven Boys. It kept me reading trying to figure out what is actually at play in this world. That intrigue reminded me a lot of the rich world of the Beautiful Creatures and definitely made me a fan of this new world.

However, will say that I did struggle with the magic/supernatural elements of the world at times. Part of the reason I was so interesting in reading was that I wanted to better understand what was actually happening! I think this is just a me thing (I was reading The Raven Boys on a road trip so I was easily distracted).

–The Friendship of the Boys–

Unlike The Wolves of Mercy Falls Series, I actually liked all of the leads here!

First, the brotherhood of the boys is fantastic! It’s nice to see such strong male relationships be the focus of the story as opposed to the romantic relationship between a boy and girl. They are all so interesting and unique and they truly make this story.

Blue is also a strong character as well. Again, I was never irritated by her or her actions so it made it easy to read her story.

What I Didn’t Like:

–The Plot is so Slow!–

While the mystery of the world kept me reading, I found the plot itself to be rather slow. The beginning and end had a lot of great twists and developments but I found everything just stayed stagnant in the middle. Especially in The Dream Thieves (#2). I quickly lost interest in the nonexistent plot developments; my mind wasn’t stimulated to keep reading (even reading the complete recap on Recaptains bored me).

–Slightly Misleading Synopsis in terms of Romance–

I thought the synopsis for The Raven Boys was grossly misleading with respect to the romance. It made it seem (to me) that that story was going to be focused on Gansey and Blue fighting an inevitable love and that is far from the case.

The romance is such a minor, minor aspect to the plot (at least in the first book) so don’t expect a page consuming romance here…or at least right away. (Given the spoilers I read, I guess there are some major developments near the end of the series that will appease people).

Will I Finish It?

I don’t think so. I was actually reminded of my experience reading The Darkest Minds where I toughed it out because the twists near the end grabbed my attention but then I struggled through the rest of the series. I don’t want to do that again, so I am going to leave it all here and walk away.

Series Rating: DNF

The Raven Boys 3.5/5 | The Dream Thieves DNF | Blue Lily, Lily Blue N/A | The Raven King N/A

overall

I’m definitely in the minority here but this series was just not for me. It’s a slower novel that focuses more on the characters progressing through their lives as they navigate the mysterious world around them.

Read if You Like: slower stories, magic, psychics
Avoid if You: want more romance
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Series Review: Fury by Elizabeth Miles

Series Review: Is this series worth your time? Does it get better as the novels progress? Or does it get worse? Find out below:

Series: Fury Trilogy
Author: Elizabeth Miles
# of Books: 3 (Fury, Envy, Eternity)
Book Order: Chronological
Complete?: Yes
Genre: Young Adult, Mythology, Paranormal, Urban Fantasy, Romance, Dark
Heat Rating: warm
Point of View: Third Person

Thoughts:

PLEASE NOTE: That I only read the first book, Fury, of this series. Find out why I didn’t pick up the rest below…

First, I want to admit that I read Fury about 2 years ago and don’t really remember it all that well. Which is the first sign that this review isn’t going to be about a stellar book–but I’ll try my best to give a well-delivered review.

What drew me to this series was the cover (which isn’t the one I have up above, rather is features a creepy looking red-haired girl). I do remember stumbling across it shortly after I set up my Goodreads account and checking to see if my library had copies. It did so I grabbed the first and second book and got ready to be sucked into a deceptive world.

Yeah, I didn’t get pulled into anything–I actually pulled this book away from me and never bothered to pick up the second novel.

This book was just plain boring (ie. slow) coupled with the fact that I had no clue what was actually happening. I mean, I got the gist of everything: Em and Chase are not so nice teens who have been selected to be punished for their “sins”. But what I never got was the purpose of the Furies–you know, the main antagonists of and reason for the series. I honestly don’t think they did anything other than show up occasionally and be pretty. So unfortunately the promised mythology of this series did not deliver.

Neither did the characters really. I don’t mind if my characters have flaws or are considered “anti-heroes”. I love reading about a villain or not so nice person as much as I enjoy reading about a nice person. I actually prefer my characters to have flaws because perfect people, in novels, drive me nuts. But with these characters it just didn’t work: they still drove me nuts.

I didn’t connect with Em’s character at all. Did I appreciate the fact that she was after her BFF’s boyfriend? No. Did I think she deserved to die because of it? Ah, no because that is a little on the extreme side of punishments. (Plus, it takes two to tango and Zach is just as much to blame really in my opinion.) Chase’s story I didn’t mind so much because it actually interested me. I felt like he had some depth to his personality and I understand why he was chosen by the Furies. If it wasn’t for Chase’s story I probably would have stopped reading this book altogether–or died of boredom by Em.

So even though the story continues in Envy, I had no desire to find out what happens next. I didn’t even bother to open the book and try reading the first chapter. Even reading the synopsis for Envy and Eternity didn’t spark my interest and I quickly labeled this series as incomplete.

Conclusion:

Great concept, poor execution (no pun intended). This series just focused on the wrong things and not enough on the important parts. I felt like it never went anywhere and it wasn’t what I was expecting. I suppose if you like darker, slower paranormal YA this is a good series for you but I don’t know many people who would enjoy this one.

Rating: 2.5/5
Would I Recommend this Series to a Friend: No

Similar Reads: Swoon by Nina Malkin (Swoon Series #1)

Synopsis for Fury (from Goodreads):
Sometimes sorry isn’t enough….

It’s winter break in Ascension, Maine. The snow is falling and everything looks pristine and peaceful. But not all is as it seems…

Between cozy traditions and parties with her friends, Emily loves the holidays. And this year’s even better—the guy she’s been into for months is finally noticing her. But Em knows if she starts things with him, there’s no turning back. Because his girlfriend is Em’s best friend.

On the other side of town, Chase is having problems of his own. The stress of his home life is starting to take its toll, and his social life is unraveling. But that’s nothing compared to what’s really haunting him. Chase has done something cruel…something the perfect guy he pretends to be would never do. And it’s only a matter of time before he’s exposed.

In Ascension, mistakes can be deadly. And three girls—three beautiful, mysterious girls—are here to choose who will pay. Em and Chase have been chosen.

Single Sundays: Cold Calls by Charles Benoit

Single Sundays: While this blog may be focused on reviewing book series as a whole, we can’t forget about the good ole’ standalone novel! On Sundays, I will review a novel that is considered to be a standalone novel. Here is this week’s offering:

Synopsis for Cold Calls (from Goodreads):
In the vein of the teen suspense classics I Know What You Did Last Summer and The Face on the Milk Carton, Cold Calls is a chilling thriller, an unsettling mystery, and a provocative exploration of bullying, culpability, and the cost of keeping secrets.

Three high school students-Eric, Shelly, and Fatima-have one thing in common: “I know your secret.”
Each one is blackmailed into bullying specifically targeted schoolmates by a mysterious caller who whispers from their cell phones and holds carefully guarded secrets over their heads. But how could anyone have obtained that photo, read those hidden pages, uncovered this buried past? Thrown together, the three teens join forces to find the stranger who threatens them-before time runs out and their shattering secrets are revealed . . .

This suspenseful, pitch-perfect mystery-thriller raises timely questions about privacy, bullying, and culpability.

Review:

When this book was first published, it seemed to be everywhere for me. I read the synopsis and it managed to grab my attention. It sounded like a realistic Pretty Little Liars mixed with messages about bullying and social media to teach a lesson and it promised to be a suspenseful thriller so I was looking forward to reading it.

Unfortunately, this book missed the mark for me in many ways. It wasn’t suspenseful–in fact it was very tame–and while it did raise some questions about social media, bullying and privacy I didn’t feel like it did anything useful with those questions.

This book is slow–it’s only saving grace is that it isn’t super long. I wouldn’t have continued to read it if it had been longer than what it actually was. It wasn’t suspenseful in any way to me; maybe I had the wrong expectations going into it. But to be fair, you can’t claim that it is similar to the movie I Know What You did Last Summer and not expect some stalker killer following the group around. So don’t get your hopes up that it’s going to be that type of thriller. It’s more a mystery than anything with the 3 teens trying to figure out why they are the targets and who is the one targeting them. However, I found most of the novel focused on each teen struggling with their secret and the possible consequences of its unveiling and to me that was boring.

The three characters, Eric, Shelly and Fatima, are your everyday people so I found that this book was very realistic in that respect. Their secrets were secrets any teen could have and I liked that it wasn’t some elaborate, over the top secret. To be honest though, I found them kind of boring so that dampened my reading experience. I like realism in stories like this but I wish there was more development. I also wish that the 3 of them took ownership of their secrets and did something about them instead of just trying to bury them.

One thing that I really disliked about this novel was that nothing felt resumed to me. Sure, the mystery is solved but I felt like the bigger issues, like bullying, social media privacy and “culpability” (who is to blame), where barely touched upon. Perhaps the purpose of the novel was to simply bring them to the reader’s attention but I would have liked more elaboration or some more discussion about them. I just felt like there were no serious consequences for any of the characters actions–but maybe that was the point: to highlight the fact that society thinks nothing of these issues on a regular basis. If that was the mission, it succeeded but I wish there was more to it.

Conclusion:

This read was meh to me. I can appreciate what it was attempting to do, I just wish it did it in a different, more exciting way. It’s a quick, pretty realistic read but I think readers will get bored with it pretty quickly.

Rating: 2/5
Would I Recommend this Book to a Friend: No. I think it might make for an interesting read for a school class because I think there is a lot of potential for discussion but for the everyday reader it isn’t that exciting.

Shorthand Stats:
Genre: Teen, Mystery, Thriller, Realistic
Recommended for15+
Heat Rating: cold
Point of View: Third Person
SERIESous’ Top Book Series: Boring Reads of 2014
Similar Reads: Rosebush by Michele Jaffe

DNF Series Review: Gilded Wings by Aimee Agresti

Series Review: Is this series worth your time? Does it get better as the novels progress? Or does it get worse? Find out below:

SERIESous’ Top Book Series: Worst Reads of 2014 (Illuminate)
Series: Gilded Wings Trilogy
Author: Aimee Agresti
# of Books: 3 (Illuminate, Infatuate, Book 3)
Book Order: Chronological
Complete?: No, Book 3 will be published in the near future
Genre: Young Adult, Supernatural, Romance
Heat Rating: cool
Point of View: First Person, Single
Publication Dates: March 2012 – ongoing
Source & Format: Own–eBook

thoughts

PLEASE NOTE: That I only read 50% of Illuminate (Book 1) when I wrote this review. I stopped reading it and currently have no plans to finish it. Find out why below:

My Expectations:

Illuminate has been on my Kobo for quite some time now but I only managed to read it this year. It was simply a case of out of sight, out of mind and its subsequent burial in my Kobo once I bought more books.

My Review:

Anyways: I started Illuminate and was shocked by how long it was. It nearly put me to sleep a few times because I found it so slow. This book is one that suffers from a very detailed exposition–so detailed that it is actually mind-numbing and I would forget what I was reading because I would get lost in thought or fall asleep. I NEVER FALL ASLEEP READING A BOOK, especially in broad daylight. There really was no need for the drivel that is in this book–and as I said before, it was USELESS information. I love getting a full description of the scene but this was overboard and in place of essential character interaction. I found a lot of the dialogue between the characters was also unnecessary and boring.

I was 48% through the book when I made the decision to stop reading–despite having paid for this book and also having the sequel, Infatuate, out from the library. There were two reasons I stopped reading: 1) was that my Kobo was telling me that it was going to take another 5 hours to finish it; and 2) there was absolutely no plot happening.

Again, this book suffered from too much detail and it shows in the nonexistent plotline. The parts where Haven reads from the mysterious book and ACTUALLY interacts with Lucian are too few and far between for my tastes. I was very bored with this book and even reading the plot synopsis for the sequel, Infatuate, wasn’t enough to stimulate my curiosity for what is actually happening at this hotel and to Haven.

It doesn’t help that Haven is extremely dull herself. I didn’t understand her fascination with Lucian at all. They met twice and only spoke a handful of words to each other and she fancies herself in love with him. I was expecting more romance in the story but instead, it focused more on Haven doing every day things at her internship and giving a minute-by-minute account of what she does in a day–which is BORING! So I think it goes without saying that this book was lacking in sexual tension or any romantic interaction really–and that makes it a dull read.

One day in the far future I might decide to finish Illuminate just for the sake of having a complete library on my Kobo–but until that day comes, I won’t be finishing this series anytime soon.

Series Rating: DNF

Illuminate 1/5 | Infatuate N/A | Book 3 N/A

overall

For me, this is one of these book series that I should have read the reviews to before I bought it. I think I was blinded by the cover because if I managed to read the reviews I probably wouldn’t have read this book at all. Just a poor execution for a good idea (or what I assume is the idea). If you want a similar book but with a much better plot and execution, read Sweet Evil by Wendy Higgins.

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Synopsis for Illuminate (from Goodreads):

Haven Terra is a brainy, shy high school outcast. But everything changes when she is awarded a prestigious internship at a posh Chicago hotel under the watchful eyes of a group of gorgeous strangers: the powerful and alluring hotel owner Aurelia Brown; her second-in-command, the dashing Lucian Grove; and their stunning but aloof staff of glamazons called The Outfit.

As Haven begins falling for Lucian, she discovers that these beautiful people are not quite what they seem. With the help of a mysterious book, she uncovers the evil agenda of Aurelia and company: they’re in the business of buying souls. Will they succeed in wooing Haven to join them in their recruitment efforts, or will she be able to thwart this devilish set’s plans to take the souls of her classmates on prom night at the hotel?

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